Category Archives: research

Cumberland Hodge Fights the Devil in Gateshead

All ye whom literature engages, Come read my book through all its pages, It far surpasses former ages For truth and diction; Compar’d with which the wisest sages Wrought nought but fiction. When the irrepressible Wesleyan preacher Hodgson Casson arrived … Continue reading

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Oystershell Hall, Newcastle

Although considered something of a gastronomic indulgence now, Oysters were once staples of the English diet. In 1910 the British Government estimated that the oyster trade was the most important industry in the world and in Victorian metropoles oysters were … Continue reading

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Ordnance Survey History in the Walls of Newcastle

Chiseled into the walls of buildings around the UK are marks which might seem strange—even mysterious—if you’re not familiar with their purpose. [1] The symbols comprise a horizontal line with three lines pointing toward it to create an arrow. Although … Continue reading

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Secret Architecture of the Tyne & Wear Metro

I was fascinated when I first read Geoff Manaugh’s post about New York City’s fake house. 58 Joralemon Street in Brooklyn has all of the appearances of a Greek revival townhouse but is in fact an elaborate façade for a … Continue reading

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Cartography of the Tyne & Wear Metro

There’s a very strong relationship between a transit system’s cartographic representation and its user efficiency. Henry Beck’s iconic London Underground map was an instant success with the public precisely because it showed a ‘clear and consistent visual of the lines, … Continue reading

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Photoessay: Derelict Newcastle

This is a portrait of city in perpetual stasis. The collection shows an unauthorised narrative of Newcastle behind fences, over walls and in places you’re not meant to look. Images of the Tyne Bridge are cultural shorthand for Newcastle. The greeny-blue steel … Continue reading

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