Category Archives: books

Missing Buildings

Missing Buildings by Thom and Beth Atkinson. It takes many years, but if you spend enough time looking at buildings you hone your ability to spot one that’s missing. Sometimes it’s easy. You train your eye to look for unusual … Continue reading

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Psychogeography

Psychogeography is Merlin Coverley’s compact history of the now resurgent practice of using walking as a way to explore the relationship our environment has on our behaviour, whether conscious or unconscious. If you are new to the world of derives, … Continue reading

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From Hill to Sea

A frequent criticism heaped on practitioners of psychogeography is that despite its widespread acknowledgement as useful way to explore and interpret the landscape, it remains confined to theory rather than praxis. Even at the time when the concept was crystallised … Continue reading

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Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments

Nature is a governing feature of postindustrial architecture and planning. Few would contradict the notion that living in harmony with nature—with greenbelts, sunshine and beautifully-landscaped parks enhances our lives. In prioritising this mode of living we adopt an exclusionary definition … Continue reading

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Isolated Building Studies

There’s something romantic about “nail houses”. That’s what China calls a building whose owners refuse to vacate in the face of mass redevelopment. The phenomenon came about when China’s population increase and flow towards urban centres began. As China’s cities … Continue reading

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Non-Places

Marc Augé is a French anthropologist who, in many ways, is typical of continental social scientists in that he spends the majority of Non-Places providing a deep theoretical justification for his research, carefully situating it in particular strains of anthropology and … Continue reading

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Hyperart: Thomasson

“Thomasson” is the term coined by Japanese conceptual artist Genpei Akasegawa to describe vestigial remains of the urban past that can be found in any city around the world. These are the staircases that don’t lead to dead ends, the … Continue reading

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